Federal Accountability

Minnesota’s New Accountability System under Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Flexibility

ESEA Flexibility Background

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) was reauthorized in 2001 and became known as No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Since then the U.S. Department of Education (USED) recognized that the state accountability and reform landscape had significantly changed since No Child Left Behind was passed.

In September 2011, President Obama announced that the USED would be formally inviting states to apply for "ESEA Flexibility" (waivers) in exchange for state leadership in meeting four key principles.

The Minnesota Department of Education (MDE) submitted an application for flexibility waivers that was approved on February 9, 2012. Under ESEA Flexibility, Minnesota built a next generation accountability system that builds on and moves beyond NCLB requirements.

What did we get in the waiver?

• New Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) targets, called Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs)
• Multiple Measurement Rating (MMR) and Focus Rating (FR) System
• Eliminate AYP sanctions
• Eliminate AYP financial mandates
• Greater flexibility with federal ESEA funds
• Enhanced statewide system of support to implement school improvement planning (Centers of Excellence)
• Renewed focus and support for excellence for all students

What stays the same?

• Rigorous academic standards
• Valid and reliable academic achievement assessments
• Public reporting
• Calculation of AYP
• Disaggregated data
• Federal funding formulas and programs
• Highly qualified teacher requirement

Our new accountability system: what is it all about?

• Focused on closing the achievement gap and promoting high growth for all students
• Built around multiple measurements
• Creating incentives for high performance
• Directly addressing the growth of subgroups for the first time
• Providing support for locally-developed school improvement plans

Multiple Measurements Rating

ALL schools are given an annual MMR consisting of four measurements:

• Proficiency
• Student Growth
• Achievement Gap Reduction
• Graduation Rate

Total MMR

• Each domain is worth 25 points

• The MMR is generated by dividing the total number of points earned by the total number of points possible

• For most elementary and middle schools, 75 points possible

• For most high schools, 100 points possible

• The MMR is a 0-100 percentage for all schools

Proficiency Domain

• Proficiency domain uses AYP index model

• Schools earn points based on a weighted percentage of subgroups making AYP

• Weighting is based on the size of subgroups

• Subgroups can’t meet AYP targets through Safe Harbor

• Uses a value for each AYP subgroup: Meeting AYP Target or Not Meeting AYP Target
• Uses only AYP marks of “A” as passing
• Only subgroups with at least 20 students are included
• Uses grades 3 through 8 and 11 for math and grades 3 through 8 and 10 for reading

Proficiency Example

Apple Secondary School Example

• Weighted percentage of subgroups reaching AYP target = 74.8%
• Based on all other secondary schools in the state, this puts the school in the 23rd percentile
• .23 x 25 points possible = 5.75 points
• 5.75 points earned in Proficiency domain

Growth Domain

Growth measures ability of schools to get students to exceed predicted growth

• Student growth scores are based on the students’ last assessment result and being above or below prediction
• School growth score is average of student growth scores
• Positive growth score indicates success
• Uses individual student growth scores
• Averages growth score for reading and math to generate one student growth score
• Does not use subgroups
• Students need matching tests across years to measure growth
• Limited to grades 4 through 8 and 11 for math and grades 4 through 8 and 10 for reading
• Positive growth score indicates success

Growth Example

Apple Secondary School Example

• Average growth score = .3302
• Based on all other secondary schools in the state, this puts the school in the 80th percentile
• .80 x 25 points possible = 20 points
• 20 points earned in Growth domain

Achievement Gap Reduction

Measures the ability of schools to get higher levels of growth from lower-performing subgroups than statewide average growth for higher-performing subgroups

• School American Indian growth compared to statewide White growth
• School Asian growth compared to statewide White growth
• School Hispanic growth compared to statewide White growth
• School Black growth compared to statewide White growth
• School English Learner (EL) growth compared to statewide non-EL growth
• School Special Ed growth compared to statewide non-Special Ed growth
• School FRPL growth compared to statewide non-FRPL growth
• Negative score indicates success

Achievement Gap Reduction Domain

• Uses individual student growth scores
• Uses average growth score for seven AYP subgroups including American Indian, Asian, Hispanic, Black, FRPL, Special Ed, and EL
• Measures gap against state average growth score for subgroup counterpart
• Needs at least 20 unique students across all subgroups to include Achievement Gap Reduction domain in MMR
• Limited to grades 4 through 8 and 11 for math and grades 4 through 8 and 10 for reading

Achievement Gap Reduction Example

Apple Secondary School Example

• Achievement Gap Reduction Score = -0.1181
• Based on all other secondary schools in the state, this puts the school in the 91st percentile
• .91 x 25 points possible = 22.75 points
• 22.75 points earned in Achievement Gap Reduction domain

Graduation Rate Domain

Schools earn points based on the weighted percentage of subgroups that meet AYP target in graduation rate.

• Uses same methodology as Proficiency domain
• Weighting is based on the size of subgroups
• AYP grad rate targets are 90% for each subgroup
• Uses a value for each AYP subgroup: Meeting AYP Target or Not Meeting AYP Target
• Uses only AYP marks of “A” as passing
• Only subgroups with at least 40 students are included
• Calculated only for schools serving grade 12 students

Graduation Example

Apple Secondary School Example

• Weighted percentage of subgroups reaching AYP target = 88%
• Based on all other secondary schools in the state, this puts the school in the 21st percentile
• .21 x 25 points possible = 5.25 points
• 5.25 points earned in Graduation domain

Total MMR Example

The MMR is generated by dividing the total number of points earned by the total number of points possible.

• Proficiency: 5.75 points
• Growth: 20 points
• Achievement Gap Reduction: 22.75 points
• Graduation: 5.25 points
• Total points earned divided by points possible: 53.75/100
• Apple Secondary School MMR = 53.75%

Total Focus Rating (FR)

All schools in the state also get an FR

Focus Rating measures proficiency and growth of minority students and students receiving special services (EL, Special Ed, FRPL) in the following two domains:

• Focused Proficiency
• Achievement Gap Reduction

Each domain is worth 25 points, for 50 possible points

Focused Proficiency

Schools earn points based on a weighted percentage of subgroups making AYP

• Uses AYP index model
• Weighting is based on the size of subgroups
• Calculated the same as the MMR Proficiency Domain, using only seven AYP subgroups: American Indian, Asian, Hispanic, Black, FRPL, Special Ed, and EL
• Uses a value for each AYP subgroup: meeting AYP target or not meeting AYP target
• Uses only AYP marks of “A” as passing
• Only subgroups with at least 20 students are included
• Uses grades 3 through 8 and 11 for math and grades 3 through 8 and 10 for reading

Focused Proficiency Example

Apple Secondary School Example

• Weighted percentage of subgroups reaching AYP target = 100%
• Based on all other secondary schools in the state, this puts the school in the 99th percentile
• .99 x 25 points possible = 24.97 points
• 24.97 points earned in Focused Proficiency domain

Achievement Gap Reduction

Measures the ability of schools to get higher levels of growth from lower-performing subgroups than statewide average growth for higher-performing subgroups

• School American Indian growth compared to statewide White growth
• School Asian growth compared to statewide White growth
• School Hispanic growth compared to statewide White growth
• School Black growth compared to statewide White growth
• School EL growth compared to statewide non-EL growth
• School Special Ed growth compared to statewide non-Special Ed growth
• School FRPL growth compared to statewide non-FRPL growth
• Negative score indicates success

Achievement Gap Reduction Domain

• Uses individual student growth scores
• Uses average growth score for seven AYP subgroups including American Indian, Asian, Hispanic, Black, FRPL, Special Ed, and EL
• Measures gap against state average growth score for subgroup counterpart
• Needs at least 20 unique students across all subgroups to include AGR domain in MMR
• Limited to grades 4 through 8 and 11 for math and grades 4 through 8 and 10 for reading

Achievement Gap Reduction Example

Apple Secondary School Example

• Achievement Gap Reduction Score = -0.1181
• Based on all other secondary schools in the state, this puts the school in the 91st percentile
• .91 x 25 points possible = 22.75 points
• 22.75 points earned in Achievement Gap Reduction domain

Total FR Example

The FR is generated by dividing the total number of points earned by the total number of points possible.

• Focused Proficiency: 24.97 points
• Achievement Gap Reduction: 22.75 points
• Total points earned divided by points possible: 47.72/50
• Apple Secondary School FR = 95.44%

Recognition, Accountability and Support

A school must be served with Title I funds to receive one of the five following designations:

Reward School: Top 15% on MMR

• Annual designation

Celebration Eligible School: Next 25% below Reward on MMR

• Annual designation

Continuous Improvement School: Lowest 25% on MMR (not already Priority or Focus)

• Annual designation

Focus School: Bottom 10% on FR

• Designated every three years

Priority School: Bottom 5% on MMR

• Designated every three years

Exit Criteria for Priority and Focus Schools

Priority schools can exit their status in the following ways:

• Two consecutive years out of the bottom 25 percent on the MMR starting in 2012
• Immediate exit if a Reward school any year starting in 2012

Focus schools can exit their status if they have:

• Two consecutive years out of the bottom 25 percent on the FR starting in 2012

SIG schools can exit their status if:

• They are out of the bottom 25 percent on the MMR after the final year of the three-year grant (19 SIG schools have opportunity to exit based on 2013 MMR)

Revised December 2013